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The Best Whole Wheat Sourdough Tortillas (So Easy!)

Tortillas are another one of those kitchen staples that I’ve had a hard time finding a brand with clean ingredients. Many contain hydrogenated oils among other things.. yuck! I discovered that making homemade sourdough tortillas is honestly so easy, that I’ve never gone back to store-bought! In this blog post I’ll show you just how easy it is to make homemade whole wheat sourdough tortillas. Let’s jump in! 

whole wheat sourdough tortillas on concrete countertop

Why You Shouldn’t Eat Store-Bought Tortillas

This homemade sourdough tortillas recipe contains only 5 ingredients. In comparison, a tortilla from the store might contain upwards of 20+. Take a look at the ingredients in this popular brand:

Enriched Bleached Flour (Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, Vegetable Shortening (Interesterified and Hydrogenated Soybean Oils), Contains 2% or Less of: Sugar, Salt, Leavening (Sodium Bicarbonate, Sodium Aluminum Sulfate, Corn Starch, Monocalcium Phosphate and/or Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Calcium Sulfate), Distilled Monoglycerides, Enzymes, Wheat Starch, Calcium Carbonate, Antioxidants (Tocopherols, Ascorbic Acid, Citric Acid), Cellulose Gum, Guar Gum, Calcium Propionate and Sorbic Acid (to maintain freshness), Dough Conditioners (Fumaric Acid, Sodium Metabisulfite and/or Mono- and Diglycerides)

First of all, I can’t even pronounce most of these ingredients. Another red flag is the hydrogenated soybean oils. These standard flour tortillas have lots of yucky ingredients that I don’t want to be wrapping my breakfast burrito in.

Whole Wheat Flour vs. White Flour

Whole wheat flour is made from grinding the entire wheat kernel, including the bran, germ, and endosperm. As a result, it retains all the essential nutrients present in the wheat kernel. It is a rich source of dietary fiber, vitamins (such as B vitamins), minerals (including magnesium, zinc, and iron), and antioxidants. White flour, on the other hand, is made by milling wheat to remove the bran and germ, leaving only the starchy endosperm. As a result, many of the nutrients present in the wheat kernel, including fiber, are lost during this process. White flour is generally enriched with certain vitamins and minerals (such as iron and B vitamins) to compensate for some of the nutrient loss. The takeaway? Whole Wheat Flour is closer to the original form of the grain and retains much more nutritional value. 

view from above of blonde boy reaching for flour. bowl of tortilla dough, rolling pin, and tortilla on concrete countertop

Health Benefits of Whole Wheat Sourdough Tortillas

  1. Improved Digestibility: The fermentation process in sourdough tortillas partially breaks down gluten, making it gentler on the digestive system for those with mild gluten sensitivity. Additionally, the reduction in phytic acid helps release essential nutrients, making them more bioavailable.
  2. Increased Nutritional Value: Whole wheat sourdough tortillas contain a wealth of nutrients, including B-vitamins, minerals like magnesium, iron, and zinc, and dietary fiber. These nutrients play a crucial role in supporting overall health and well-being.
  3. Lower Glycemic Index: Compared to regular tortillas made with refined flour, whole wheat sourdough tortillas have a lower glycemic index, which means they cause a slower rise in blood sugar levels. This is especially beneficial for individuals with diabetes or those looking to maintain stable energy levels throughout the day.
  4. Gut Health: The fermentation process in sourdough promotes the growth of beneficial gut bacteria, supporting a healthy gut microbiome, and enhancing overall digestive health.

Tools You Will Need:

  • Medium Bowl
  • Plastic Wrap or Clean Tea Towel
  • Pastry Cutter (or two forks)
  • Rolling Pin
  • Cast Iron Skillet or Non-Toxic Frying Pan
  • Cooling Rack
concrete countertop with rolling pin, jar of flour, and flour sprinkled on countertop

Ingredient List For Whole Wheat Sourdough Tortillas:

These easy recipe only requires five ingredients. 

  • 3 Cups Whole Grain Flour (I use sprouted whole wheat from a local bakery)
  • 1/2 Cup Sourdough Starter (can be fed or discard)
  • 1 Tsp Unrefined Salt
  • 1/2 Cup – 1 Cup Hot Water
  • 1 1/2 Sticks Grass-fed Butter

Tips For Making Whole Wheat Sourdough Tortillas:

Tip #1: Use lots of flour when you are rolling out your tortillas. Generously flour your hands, the surface you are working on, and your rolling pin. This will help the dough not to stick

Tip #2: Sure, oblong tortillas have character. However if you are hoping to make your tortillas nice and round, flip often on your floured surface and roll from the inside out in different directions. I sometimes also slice off pieces that are sticking out really far to round it out a little more. You can use a butter knife for this.

Tip #3: Freeze your extras! Once they have cooled completely, you can store in a gallon zip lock bag in the freezer. You can put parchment paper in-between each one if you prefer, but I don’t usually need it. I pull tortillas out almost daily for breakfast burritos, quesadillas, wraps and more. 

Tip #4: You want your pan to be hot and dry. Don’t add any oil to the pan! 

blonde boy rolling whole wheat tortillas on concrete countertop

Tip #5: This recipe is for whole wheat tortillas, but you can also substitute all purpose flour. The final product is still amazing!

Tip #6: I thought a tortilla press would save me time, but it doesn’t. I found that it didn’t get them thin enough (they were more like flat bread consistency). Rolling them out by hand seems to be the best way and is honestly kind of fun! 

Tip #7: Get your kids involved! My son Jace (2) helps roll out dough and he loves it. He loves to eat his own creations even more!

How To Make Whole Wheat Sourdough Tortillas

These tortillas are so simple and easy to make. You will want to plan ahead a little bit so that your dough can ferment overnight. Here are the steps to making the best sourdough tortillas: 

The Night Before:

  1. Add the dry ingredients (flour and salt) to a glass bowl and mix together. 
  2. Cut cold butter into small chunks (about the size of 1 TB) and add to the flour/salt mixture
  3. Use a pastry cutter or two forks to cut the butter into the flour mixture until it is crumbly and mostly mixed in. There will be some small chunks and that’s okay
  4. Next, add your sourdough starter. Roughly mix in, it doesn’t have to be perfect at this point
  5. Slowly add in HOT water starting with 1/2 Cup. Start to mix in (you may have to use your hands). If the mixture is still dry, slowly add more water until you have a nice soft dough. I usually use the full cup of water, but it will depend on your flour and how dry of a climate you live in
  6. Cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel and let the dough ferment for 8-12 hours. 

The Next Day:

  1. After the fermentation period, turn your oven burner onto medium / medium high heat to prepare the Cast Iron Pan (Cast Iron pans hold heat really well, medium is my default when cooking tortillas)
  2. While your pan is heating up, prepare your work surface. Sprinkle with plenty of flour
  3. Split the tortilla dough into small pieces. Each ball of dough should be about the size of a golf ball. This recipe will make anywhere from 15-20 tortillas depending on how large your dough balls are. 
  4. Take a dough ball, roll it into a ball, and flatten on your floured surface using your hand. Roll the tortilla from the inside out, flipping continually and adding more flour if you need. Keep rolling out your tortilla until it is nice and thin.
  5. Place the tortilla in the hot pan. Cook on the first side for 30 second – 1 minute or until it starts to bubble up. Flip and cook on the other side for 30 seconds – 1 minute. You are looking for nice, golden brown bubbles!
  6. While the first tortilla is cooking, start rolling out your next tortilla.
  7. Repeat until all your tortillas are done! 
  8. Cool completely before storing. I like to place my cooked tortillas on a cooling rack after they are done to speed up the cooling process. These tortillas can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for 3-5 days or frozen for 6 months or so.
hand holding dough ball of sourdough tortillas over concrete countertop
rolling out whole wheat tortillas on concrete countertop

FAQs

What if I don’t have Sourdough Starter?

Sourdough starter is actually really easy to make! I used this guide from Farmhouse on Boone to make my own sourdough starter and now I use it all the time.

Do I have to use whole wheat flour?

No! I actually adapted this recipe from a recipe from one that used all-purpose flour. I still make them occasionally with white flour and they are bomb.

If you like this recipe, please give it a 5-star review and give it a share!

close up view of whole wheat sourdough tortillas on a concrete countertop

The Best Whole Wheat Sourdough Tortillas (So Easy!)

These homemade tortillas are easy to make and absolutely delicious. They are packed with nutrients and fiber from whole grains and are easy to digest. Happy rolling!
Print Recipe
Prep Time:10 minutes
Cook Time:30 minutes
Fermentation:8 hours
Total Time:8 hours 40 minutes

Equipment

  • 1 Medium Bowl
  • Plastic Wrap or Tea Towel
  • 1 Pastry Cutter
  • 1 Rolling Pin
  • 1 Cast Iron Skillet or Non-Toxic Frying Pan
  • 1 Cooling Rack Optional

Ingredients

  • 3 Cups Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1/2 Cup Sourdough Starter Doesn't have to be fed
  • 1 Tsp Unrefined Salt
  • 1 Cup HOT Water not warm, hot!
  • 12 Tbsp Grass-Fed Butter 1 1/2 Sticks, cold

Instructions

The Night Before

  • Add the dry ingredients (flour and salt) to a glass bowl and mix together. 
  • Cut cold butter into small chunks (about the size of 1 TB) and add to the flour/salt mixture
  • Use a pastry cutter or two forks to cut the butter into the flour mixture until it is crumbly and mostly mixed in. There will be some small chunks.
  • Next, add your sourdough starter. Roughly mix in, it doesn't have to be perfect at this point
  • Slowly add in hot water starting with 1/2 Cup. Start to mix in (you may have to use your hands). If the mixture is still dry, slowly add more water until you have a nice soft dough. I usually use the full cup of water, but it will depend on your flour and how dry of a climate you live in
  • Cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel and let the dough ferment for 8-12 hours

The Next Day

  • After the fermentation period, turn your oven burner onto medium / medium high heat to prepare the Cast Iron Pan (Cast Iron pans hold heat really well, medium is my default when cooking tortillas)
  • While your pan is heating up, prepare your work surface. Sprinkle with plenty of flour
  • Split the tortilla dough into small pieces. Each ball of dough should be about the size of a golf ball. This recipe will make anywhere from 15-20 tortillas depending on how large your dough balls are. 
  • Take a dough ball, roll it into a ball, and flatten on your floured surface using your hand. Roll the tortilla from the inside out, flipping continually and adding more flour if you need. Keep rolling out your tortilla until it is nice and thin.
  • Place the tortilla in the hot pan. Cook on the first side for 30 second – 1 minute or until it starts to bubble up. Flip and cook on the other side for 30 seconds – 1 minute. You are looking for nice, golden brown bubbles!
  • While the first tortilla is cooking, start rolling out your next tortilla.
  • Repeat until all your tortillas are cooked!
  • Cool completely before storing. I like to place my cooked tortillas on a cooling rack after they are done to speed up the cooling process. These tortillas can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for 3-5 days or frozen for 6 months or so.
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: sourdough, tortillas, wrap
Servings: 15 tortillas
Calories: 180kcal

Did you make these healthy tortillas?

What did you think? If you loved them as much as I do, please leave me a review. I so appreciate it!

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5 Comments

  1. I’ve been looking for a recipe just like this! I’ll give it a try and leave a comment as to how much I loved it! Thank you for this post! I had no idea you could make tortillas out of sourdough 👍

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